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William Lambert, Detroit’s great Underground Railroad conductor

A few days ago on March 10, there were a number of events commemorating the death of Harriet Tubman, the legendary abolitionist who died on this date in 1913.
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Celebrating Madam C.J. Walker’s tremendous legacy 

In 1987, March was declared Women’s History Month. During this month, Americans celebrate women of all races who dedicated their lives fighting and ensuring equality and the protection of women’s rights.
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A ‘Forever Stamp’ for a forever freedom fighter, Dorothy Height

Besides discovering Dorothy Height in practically every history book worth its salt, especially when it comes to prominent African-American women, there was her ever resourceful family to provide a more intimate portrait of her.
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Tony winner Tonya Pinkins takes on directing role with one-act play

When you hear the name Tonya Pinkins, you probably think of the TV actress (she’s most well-known for her role on “All My Children”).
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PBS previews Maya Angelou documentary at Schomburg with Clintons as special guests

“A Rock, A River, A Tree…,” the first words of the poem “On the Pulse of Morning”, were written by actress, dancer, author, professor, activist and poet Maya Angelou. Angelou, who died in 2014, delivered them in front of a ...
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Malcolm X celebrated on the 52nd anniversary of his death

The community came together Tuesday, Feb. 21, at the Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center in Washington Heights for the 52nd Memorial Anniversary Commemoration for Malcolm X.
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Bill Epton, a political activist and free speech advocate

A native of Harlem, Bill Epton was born Jan. 17, 1932, and if there is such a thing as a political prodigy, he may have been the prototype with his keen instinct for protest.
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First Black crew member to join International Space Station

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has selected astronaut Jeanette Epps to join the crew of the International Space Station in 2018
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Malcolm X: The price of freedom is death

Friday, Feb. 21, 1965 marks the day a hit squad of cold-blooded assassins aired out the Audubon Ballroom stage, expiring the physical life of Black Nationalist advocate El Hajj Malik El Shabazz, aka Malcolm X, in full view of his ...
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Frederick Douglass, an alternative truth

Who was Frederick Douglass? More importantly, why does Frederick Douglass matter to today’s America? These questions are not merely rhetorical, as the recent controversy surrounding President Trump’s Black History Month statement illustrate.
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Ferdinand Lee Barnett, publisher, lawyer, civil rights activist

For several weeks I’ve been mulling over the idea of featuring a profile of the men behind famous women.
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Vicki Garvin was a revolutionary at home and abroad

During a recent trip to Ghana and beyond its stated purposes, I found it difficult not to think of the number of African-Americans who went there after Kwame Nkrumah came to power in 1957.
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The Harlem Hellfighters: African-American WWI heroes

In the World War I era, Jim Crow segregation laws were prominent throughout the United States in all segments of society, as well as during physical combat overseas.
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The inestimable genius of Benjamin Banneker

Three things brought to mind of the genius Benjamin Banneker. Last month Cyril deGrasse Tyson, the father of noted astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, died.
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Dr. King’s legacy revived

Practically every aspect of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.—his dignity, optimism, determination, ministry, courage, sermons, admonitions, guidance, dedication, hope and even his literary prowess—was invoked by a number of elected officials and activists Monday at the National Action Network.
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