Delrawn Small family demands firing of officer Wayne Isaacs

Carr was unequivocal in her instructions for the attendees and broader community. “I want every one of you to make phone calls to our supposed leaders in power,” she said. “We must tell them, ‘We put you there, and we can take you out.’ An election is coming, and that will be our day of reckoning.”

As activists inscribed chalk outlines representing victims of police killings in the Plaza, Dempsey reflected on his brother’s life. “It’s who he was as a man,” said Dempsey. “He truly was a loving caring person. He raised us, he was basically my sister and I’s parent. Delrawn was everything to us.”

Davis added, “He was only a few years older than me, but he was like a father figure to us. It’s only right that we fight for him.”

As the event closed, attendees looked to future action and reform. “The work that I’m doing is for the next generation; for my nephew, for my son,” said Dempsey. “Because if I don’t take a stand now, they’ll be taking a stand again somewhere down the line. We’re doing this to protect them, to make sure that they have a future where they’ll be able to move freely without fearing the boys in blue.”

Others reflected on the long legacy of these violent incidents in communities of color across the nation. “We are standing in a history of oppression and a history of fighting back,” said Joseph. “Yet, I see the future is very bright for our people, because I know that we have fighters here among us.”